Tag Archives: process

Robust Crystallization Processes Developed With Workstations

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc6lEepLb-4
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Optimization of Highly Reactive Chemistry – Reducing Risks

Highly reactive chemistry is the generic term referring to chemical reactions that pose a challenge due to the potentially hazardous and/or energetic nature of the reactants, intermediates and products that are present during synthesis. Highly reactive chemistries include Grignard, acid chloride, azide, halogenation, and hydrogenation.  Continue reading

How To Develop More Robust Crystallization Processes

Crystallization and precipitation are critical processing steps in chemical development. They can serve as purification and separation steps, and have implications on the yield, purity and particle size distribution. Even though crystallization has advanced significantly over the past decade, many chemists have such short deadlines that they must base everyday decisions on past experience rather than understanding the crystals in situ. Due to the complexity of crystallization, a process may be developed simply by crashing solids out of solution and transferring a non-robust process with inconsistencies in the yield, purity and particle size distribution. Continue reading

Common Ways to Reduce Solubility and Drive Crystallization

This is the second blog post in a series dedicated to crystallization. In case you missed the first in the series, you can find it here: Introduction to Crystallization and Precipitation.

Reduce Solubility and Drive CrystallizationThe starting point for most crystallization processes is a saturated solution. Crystallization is generally achieved by reducing the solubility of the product in this solution by cooling, antisolvent addition, evaporation* or some combination of these methods. Another common method used to drive crystallization is via a chemical reaction where two or more reactants are mixed to form a solid product insoluble in the reaction mixture; a common example of this would be the reaction of an acid and a base to form a salt. Continue reading

VisiMix Conference: Influence of Mixing in Your Process

Last week, I attended the VisiMix International Conference in Boston, MA.  Held at the Colonnade Hotel, the conference focused on the influence of mixing unit operations in your process and featured presentations by well-respected leaders in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries on topics including: Continue reading

Common Ways to Reduce Solubility and Drive Crystallization

This is the second blog post in a series dedicated to crystallization.  In case you missed the first in the series, you can find it here: Introduction to Crystallization and Precipitation.

Reduce Solubility and Drive CrystallizationThe starting point for most crystallization processes is a saturated solution. Crystallization is generally achieved by reducing the solubility of the product in this solution by cooling, antisolvent addition, evaporation* or some combination of these methods. Another common method used to drive crystallization is via a chemical reaction where two or more reactants are mixed to form a solid product insoluble in the reaction mixture; a common example of this would be the reaction of an acid and a base to form a salt. Continue reading

Why Measure Particle or Droplet Distribution in Process or Development?

After last week’s introduction to liquid dosage formulations, I wanted to follow-up with: why measure the particle or droplet distribution in process or in development? Continue reading