Tag Archives: highly reactive chemistry

Optimization of Highly Reactive Chemistry – Reducing Risks

Highly reactive chemistry is the generic term referring to chemical reactions that pose a challenge due to the potentially hazardous and/or energetic nature of the reactants, intermediates and products that are present during synthesis. Highly reactive chemistries include Grignard, acid chloride, azide, halogenation, and hydrogenation.  Continue reading

2 Ways To Screen Chemicals for Reactivity Hazards

This guest post is written by Dr. Sanjeev Saraf, Senior Associate in Exponent’s Engineering Management Consulting practice. Dr. Saraf’s primary focus is on evaluating processes/products for increased safety, reliability, and economic feasibility. You can read more from the author on his process safety and risk management blog.

The reactivity hazard of a substance is normally assessed by performing thermal analysis. A small amount of the sample is heated over a range of temperature (usually within 30°C – 400°C), and temperature, pressure, and time data are recorded. This information is then used for alarm settings, relief  sizing, and process modeling. Continue reading

How To Optimize A Highly Reactive Chemistry

Highly Reactive Chemistry

Highly Reactive Chemistry

Highly reactive chemistries are used in the syntheses of drug molecules, special polymer products, herbicides and other agriculture products, high energy materials, and even special materials like nano-particles and chemo-sensors.

Examples of highly reactive chemistries include:

  • Azide chemistry
  • Diazo chemistry
  • Grignard chemistry
  • Lithium chemistry
  • Phosgene chemistry

Continue reading