Tag Archives: High Performance Liquid Chromatography

Use of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) for Biotech

Process Analytical Technology (PAT) for Biotech: A Review of Recently Reported Applications in Fermentation and BioProcessing

Fermentation and bioprocessing play critical roles in the discovery and manufacture of new pharmaceuticals and specialty chemicals, and in the sustainable production of bulk fuels and commodity chemicals. Yet fermentation processes are often operated with a minimal level of monitoring and control, limiting the ability to optimize yields and production rates. Continue reading

How Has Organic Chemistry Changed in Academia?

Traditionally, organic chemistry students have been instructed to analyze reactions using standard offline analytical methods, such as High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy, and Gas Chromatography (GC).

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How To Study Chemistry Under Actual Reaction Conditions

Traditional offline methods to analyze reaction chemistry, such as High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy, and Gas Chromatography (GC), share a common problem: when a sample is removed for analysis, it may be altered or compromised resulting in significant analytical errors. The solution for this is Continue reading

How To Overcome Process Scale-Up Challenges Using Process Analytical Technology (PAT)

Process Analytical Technology for Scale-up

Process Analytical Technology

During Part I of his two part The Role of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in Green Chemistry and Green Engineering online seminar series, Dominique Hebrault discussed scale-up challenges faced today by chemists and engineers.  Too often, offline sampling methods – mostly chromatographic methods such as High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Gas Chromatography (GC) – are used to monitor processes which fail to resolve common issues like reaction monitoring, poor mass balance, delayed initiation/reaction stalled, and loss of yield/by-products.  From a reaction engineering standpoint, obtaining heat mass balance information and preliminary kinetic data can be difficult using traditional offline methods during process scale-up.  Forming the final solid can be challenging using traditional offline methods, including filtration/drying a bottleneck, excessive washing, polymorph inconsistency, and batch to batch variability can be difficult.
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