Tag Archives: Crystallization

Polymorph Form Control: Why Care About Seeding and Cooling Rates?

In Situ Monitoring of Supersaturation and Polymorphic Form of Piracetam during Batch Cooling Crystallization

Mark Barrett and others at the University College Dublin (UCD) recently published a paper Continue reading

Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in CRO/CMO – Why is it important?

On January 25, 2012, I attended an excellent session at the IFPAC Conference where a series of presenters including Lonza, Hovione, Merck, Pfizer, and Bristol-Myers Squibb presented the value of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) and Quality by Design (QbD) within a CRO/CMO (Contract Research Organization/Contract Manufacturing Organization). Continue reading

Robust Crystallization Processes Developed With Workstations

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc6lEepLb-4
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How To Optimize Crystal Size Distribution, Improve Filtration Rates, and Batch Consistency

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VeCg6LQSYY

Chemists and Engineers need to quickly develop repeatable crystallization processes with fast cycle times. Continue reading

2011 AIChE Annual Meeting Highlights

The 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting took place October 16 to 21 in Minneapolis, MN.  The AIChE Annual Meeting is a terrific event to: Continue reading

Crystallization and Process Safety Symposium – Basel, Switzerland

Basel, Switzerland is a unique place with an impressive concentration of scientists and engineers focused on optimizing pharmaceutical and fine chemical processes. Continue reading

How to Use a Crystallization Workstation to Optimize Space for Process Understanding

During crystallization development, chemists often produce crystals rapidly without time for a full Design of Experiment (DoE).  Continue reading

How To Develop More Robust Crystallization Processes

Crystallization and precipitation are critical processing steps in chemical development. They can serve as purification and separation steps, and have implications on the yield, purity and particle size distribution. Even though crystallization has advanced significantly over the past decade, many chemists have such short deadlines that they must base everyday decisions on past experience rather than understanding the crystals in situ. Due to the complexity of crystallization, a process may be developed simply by crashing solids out of solution and transferring a non-robust process with inconsistencies in the yield, purity and particle size distribution. Continue reading