Tag Archives: crystallization blog

Common Ways to Reduce Solubility and Drive Crystallization

This is the second blog post in a series dedicated to crystallization. In case you missed the first in the series, you can find it here: Introduction to Crystallization and Precipitation.

Reduce Solubility and Drive CrystallizationThe starting point for most crystallization processes is a saturated solution. Crystallization is generally achieved by reducing the solubility of the product in this solution by cooling, antisolvent addition, evaporation* or some combination of these methods. Another common method used to drive crystallization is via a chemical reaction where two or more reactants are mixed to form a solid product insoluble in the reaction mixture; a common example of this would be the reaction of an acid and a base to form a salt. Continue reading

Introduction to Crystallization & Precipitation

Crystallization touches every aspect of our lives from the foods we eat and the medicines we take, to the fuels we use to power our communities. The majority of pharmaceutical products go through at least one crystallization step during their manufacture. Salt and sugar are delivered to our dinner tables as crystals. The unwanted crystallization of gas hydrates played a role in the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Continue reading

Common Ways to Reduce Solubility and Drive Crystallization

This is the second blog post in a series dedicated to crystallization.  In case you missed the first in the series, you can find it here: Introduction to Crystallization and Precipitation.

Reduce Solubility and Drive CrystallizationThe starting point for most crystallization processes is a saturated solution. Crystallization is generally achieved by reducing the solubility of the product in this solution by cooling, antisolvent addition, evaporation* or some combination of these methods. Another common method used to drive crystallization is via a chemical reaction where two or more reactants are mixed to form a solid product insoluble in the reaction mixture; a common example of this would be the reaction of an acid and a base to form a salt. Continue reading

Introduction to Crystallization and Precipitation

Crystallization touches every aspect of our lives from the foods we eat and the medicines we take, to the fuels we use to power our communities. The majority of pharmaceutical products go through at least one crystallization step during their manufacture.  Salt and sugar are delivered to our dinner tables as crystals.  The unwanted crystallization of gas hydrates played a role in the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Continue reading

BIWIC 2010: Optimization & Scale-up of Anti-Solvent Crystallization

Later this week, scientists and engineers will join together at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg in Germany for the BIWIC 2010 – International Workshop on Industrial Crystallization.  Topics at this year’s International Workshop on Industrial Crystallization will include fundamentals of crystallization (thermodynamics and kinetics), process design (monitoring and modeling), product design (polymorphism, salvation, stability, chiral separation, fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals), industrial applications, and intensified processes and equipment (external fields, micro technology, hybrid processes). Continue reading

Supersaturation Or the Crystal Size Distribution

Supersaturation or the Crystal Size DistributionWhich Measurement Is More Important?

In an ideal world, you may want to directly measure the crystal population within the crystallizer (a critical product quality attribute) and measure the supersaturation which is driving the process (a critical process parameter).  Today’s advanced Process Analytical Technology (PAT) allows you to measure both of these critical parameters in real time. But where should you begin – especially if budget constraints limit you to implementing only one advanced measurement. Continue reading