Category Archives: ReactIR (ATR FTIR)

Understanding Asymmetric Rhodium Catalyzed Carbenoid Reactions

As you may recall, my colleague, Dominique Hebrault, referenced the research of Professor Huw M.L. Davies and his colleagues at Emory University in a presentation that discussed  Continue reading

NESACS’s Bench to Plant Symposium

NESACS SymposiumUpon returning to the Boston area after a number of years away, I was very much looking forward to attending The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society (NESACS)’s Advances in Chemical Sciences “Bench to Plant” Symposium for the first time.  Held in Cambridge on October 22, about 100 scientists from the local area gathered for the one day Symposium focusing on Process R&D Chemistry, Organic Synthesis, and New Synthetic Methodology.

Some highlights of the top-notch presentations included:

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Is Lithium Salt More Like Organolithium Or Azaenolate?

2-Lithio-3,3-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyloxirane: Carbanion or Azaenolate?

Vito Capriati*, Saverio Florio*, Renzo Luisi, Filippo Maria Perna and Agnese Spina
Dipartimento Farmaco-Chimico, Università di Bari, Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale Metodologie e Processi Innovativi di Sintesi C.I.N.M.P.I.S., Via E. Orabona 4, I-70125 Bari, Italy; J. Org. Chem., 2008, 73 (24), pp 9552–9564.

Structure, Configurational Stability and Stereodynamics in Solution
During this work, Vito Capriati, Saverio Florio and colleagues at the University of Bari in Italy used in situ Infrared (IR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together to give a better insight into the stability of lithium salt and to ultimately answer the question:

“Is the lithium salt more like an organolithium or is it more like an azaenolate?”
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Heterobimetallic Bi−Rh Paddlewheel Carboxylates as Catalysts for Metal Carbenoid Transformations

Jørn Hansen†, Bo Li‡, Evgeny Dikarev‡, Jochen Autschbach§ and Huw M. L. Davies*†
† Department of Chemistry, Emory University, 440 Atwood Hall, 1515 Dickey Drive, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 ‡ Department of Chemistry, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York 12222 § Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 J. Org. Chem., 2009, 74 (17), pp 6564–6571

Combined Experimental and Computational Studies
This paper reports on work by Huw Davies and colleagues at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. During their work, Professor Davies and his colleagues evaluate the catalytic activity of heterobimetallic Bi-Rh carboxylate complexes in metal carbenoid chemistry and cyclopropanation reactions. Continue reading

Metal Catalyzed Transformations Using In Situ Spectroscopy

Metal Catalyzed Transformations have been a key topic in academic research for a number of years, both for their scientific interest, as well as the large number of reactions that have become important to industry. Continue reading

Upcoming Continuous Flow Chemistry Events

Regular visitors to this blog will be familiar with recent continuous flow chemistry events in what I consider to be a very exciting, fast-developing area of chemistry. When I was reading the recent blog post regarding the upcoming Pfizer Flow Technology Expo, I thought about other upcoming flow chemistry events, including: Continue reading

What is Continuous Flow Chemistry?

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7Gb7sF4sjk

Continuous flow chemistry is widely used in the chemical and petrochemical markets, and has been for decades.  The continuous flow chemistry production methodology has been gaining interest in pharmaceutical R&D due to: Continue reading

Enable Process Analytical Technology Without Modifying or Replacing Reactors

Commitment and investment to develop the use of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) is a primary reason why the pharmaceutical industry is able to find ways to streamline and improve manufacturing processes. However, there are significant challenges when implementing Process Analytical Technology (PAT) into larger-scale manufacturing, such as compatibility of measurement instrumentation with classified hazardous areas and the existing processing infrastructure. Even more important is how to sample the chemistry in situ. The majority of reactor vessels in commission today lack suitable entry points for the measurement technology that requires there modification or replacement, which can significantly increase project costs or prohibit implementation entirely. Continue reading

4th Annual Uniqsis Flow Chemistry Symposium

Uniqsis British ConsulateBy no means am I a flow chemistry expert, but as probably the case for many other chemists, continuous processing has piqued my interest over the past few years. Continue reading

UK Automated Synthesis Forum (UKASF) – Novartis

This week, the United Kingdom Automated Synthesis Forum (UKASF) will be held at Novartis in Horsham.  Ian Clemens of Novartis is the Chair of the UKASF and will deliver the opening remarks to begin the Forum on Wednesday.

The first session, which will be chaired by Steve Brough of AstraZeneca, will be on Flow Chemistry and will include: Continue reading