Category Archives: PAT and QbD

Process Analytical Technology and Quality by Design

Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in CRO/CMO – Why is it important?

On January 25, 2012, I attended an excellent session at the IFPAC Conference where a series of presenters including Lonza, Hovione, Merck, Pfizer, and Bristol-Myers Squibb presented the value of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) and Quality by Design (QbD) within a CRO/CMO (Contract Research Organization/Contract Manufacturing Organization). Continue reading

3rd Symposium on Continuous Flow Reactor Technology for Industry Applications

The 3rd Symposium on Continuous Flow Reactor Technology for Industry Applications will be held October 3 and 4 in Como, Italy.  This Symposium focuses on: Continue reading

How To Develop More Robust Crystallization Processes

Crystallization and precipitation are critical processing steps in chemical development. They can serve as purification and separation steps, and have implications on the yield, purity and particle size distribution. Even though crystallization has advanced significantly over the past decade, many chemists have such short deadlines that they must base everyday decisions on past experience rather than understanding the crystals in situ. Due to the complexity of crystallization, a process may be developed simply by crashing solids out of solution and transferring a non-robust process with inconsistencies in the yield, purity and particle size distribution. Continue reading

Designing Effective and Efficient Crystallization Processes

This is the sixth blog post in a special series dedicated to crystallization.  In case you missed the previous posts in the series, they are available here:

Previously, we looked at a case study that neatly illustrated the concept that slow supersaturation generation often results in a growth dominated process that is typically repeatable. As a rule of thumb, slow cooling works great – but its main drawback is the extended cycle times that often result. To overcome this problem, a common technique often used is non-linear cooling.

If we dive a little bit deeper into the governing equations of crystal growth and nucleation.. Continue reading

VisiMix Conference: Influence of Mixing in Your Process

Last week, I attended the VisiMix International Conference in Boston, MA.  Held at the Colonnade Hotel, the conference focused on the influence of mixing unit operations in your process and featured presentations by well-respected leaders in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries on topics including: Continue reading

Crystallization in the Pharmaceutical Industry – Shanghai Training

A technical training on Crystallization Technologies in the Pharmaceutical Industry will be held on June 23-24 in Shanghai, China.  Continue reading

Inline Particle Size, Shape & Count History: Lasentec® FBRM®

particle size Lasentec FBRM

For over 25 years, FBRM® technology has been used for real-time monitoring of particles and droplets as they naturally exist in process.   Continue reading

Particle Size Distribution, Particle Shape, and Particle Count – Track Changes

Recently, I met several scientists who did not realize Lasentec® (Lasentech) was acquired by METTLER TOLEDO.  It is hard to believe that it has already been 10 years since METTLER TOLEDO acquired Lasentec® and became the world leader for inline particle characterization technology!

Continue reading

High Resolution, Fast Understanding, Intuitive Particle Measurement

Inline particle size measurement technology is used to quickly:

  • Understand the particle system’s response when changing process parameters
  • Optimize the particle system to improve process performance and product quality
  • Control the particle system to achieve consistent particle size distribution endpoints, batch repeatability, and process stability Continue reading

AIChE Call For Crystallization Papers

The 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting – to be held October 16-21 in Minneapolis, MN – features a number of sessions on crystallization and evaporation.  Continue reading